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Scouting Out Success

Jane Poe, second from the right, will always remember her days as a young woman at Girl Scout camp. “Associating with girls that shared my interests and also brought different opinions and talents to share during our meetings was so wonderful for me at that age,” Poe says. Camaraderie is just one of the skills she learned as a Girl Scout, and she still puts it to use daily.

Jane Poe, second from the right, will always remember her days as a young woman at Girl Scout camp. “Associating with girls that shared my interests and also brought different opinions and talents to share during our meetings was so wonderful for me at that age,” Poe says. Camaraderie is just one of the skills she learned as a Girl Scout, and she still puts it to use daily.

Natalie Wilson, Features Editor

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Reining the top of the charts of organizations for girls for over 102 years, Girl Scouts has led many young women in directions that would not have been possible without the sense of leadership, responsibility, and most importantly, respect that being a member teaches. Inducting girls starting at the age of six, Girl Scouts has proven to be an amazing opportunity to bring women of integrity to the world, teaching fundamentals for personality and skills that girls that age would not be able to find anywhere else.

So many are quick to categorize scouting as a childish endeavor, influencing only the light hearted desires of little girls, but as girls grow into young women, the program brings so many opportunities that would never seem possible without scouting, including chances for international travel and outstanding service in their own community, as the program heavily pushes several service projects and volunteering at local organizations. Girls also have the opportunity to attend outdoor-skill camps, prepare to handle the struggles they will face as women in the modern world, and to dabble in the first steps in any career they may wish to pursue.

Able to vouch with a smile for the lifelong impact she received from her years as a scout, Northside Hospital Pharmacist Jane Poe spills everything from her favorite memories to the impact she received as a scout.

 

How long where you a part of the Girl Scout program?

JANE POE:  I started in the Brownies program and ended as an Ambassador, going from second grade until eleventh grade (ages seven to sixteen.) I stayed in the same troop the whole time; I still remember that we were Troop #144.

 

If you had to pick one thing in particular that you took away from Girl Scouts, what would it be?

If I had to pick one, it would be camaraderie.  Associating with girls that shared my interests and also brought different opinions and talents to share during our meetings was so wonderful for me at that age.  Most of these girls are still my friends almost 50 years later.  I value those friendships.


Before you became the pharmacist you are today, how did the traits you received in Girl Scouting guide your career choice and help you out when applying for college and for your job?

I think scouting teaches persistence in setting and achieving goals. Service badges let you set a goal and receiving a badge after completing all the requirements is such an accomplishment: deciding what you want to do in life is really like getting a service badge! Perseverance is a virtue!


As for your current position, would you say that you put the leadership and communication skills you learned through scouting to use daily?

I think working in a hospital pharmacy is somewhat like being in a Girl Scout Troop at Girl Scout Cookie sale time.  We are busy communicating on orders, entering medication demands, and delivering our medications (cookies) to the right patient (customer) at the right time.  Those cookie sales prepare you for being organized, responsible and reliable. It also teaches you good people skills, which is something I am thankful for, as I am constantly dealing with the public.


I think it is really cool that you have come so far in your career, but would you consider where you are at Northside a step in your journey, or a final destination?

I think of my 41 years at Northside as steps in a race. I hope I have many more steps to go before I cross the finish line!

 

Overall, what is your favorite Girl Scout memory?

My favorite Girl Scout memory is participating with honor guard at Taps during summer camp. This really stands out for me because of the seriousness and tradition.  No matter what foolishness went on during the day, at dusk, lowering that flag, folding it in a triangle while singing “Day is Done” was always special. Even today, I always remember that feeling at any event involving our flag.

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Scouting Out Success