The student news site of North Forsyth High School

The Raider Wire

A Review of The Giver

Engaged with the story that is unfolding before her, Sarah Klein, freshman, comments, “The book has an interesting story, but has some dull moments.”

Amanda Lewsader

Engaged with the story that is unfolding before her, Sarah Klein, freshman, comments, “The book has an interesting story, but has some dull moments.”

Amanda Lewsader, Staff Writer

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Lois Lowry is a very well known writer, responsible for creating a new world that is similar to all of the dystopian stories, but is also different and intriguing in its own way. Lowry often used great adjectives and detail to explain and create imagery for the reader to make her ideas seem clearer to them. The Giver is written from the viewpoint of Jonas, an eleven-year-old boy living in a futuristic society that has eliminated all pain, fear, war, and hatred.

He seems more intelligent and perceptive than many of his peers, and he thinks more seriously than they do about life, worrying about his own future as well as his friend Asher’s. He enjoys learning and experiencing new things: he chooses to volunteer at a variety of different centers rather than focusing on one unlike the other in the community

There is no prejudice, since everyone looks and acts the same, and there is very little competition. Everyone is unfailingly polite. The society has also eliminated choice: at age twelve, every member of the community is assigned a job based on his or her abilities and interests. They go to a choosing ceremony called ‘The Ceremony of Twelve’ and that is where they are assigned their future jobs.

In my opinion, I found the book intriguing but at certain points I found myself anticipating what would happen next. At other moments, I found the story slow and confusing where something was being dragged out. The most frustrating thing about the book is the ending; I understand that Lowry was trying to be mysterious and leave the reader suspicious of what would happen next to Jonas, but she failed to explain thoroughly what was happening in the concluding scene.

Lowry did not really venture into many characters: the only characters that are highly mentioned and that the reader will get to know are the The Giver and Jonas. The others seem to just be there, and having no real purpose but to be a part of the community.

Overall, I found the story of the book unique. I liked how I could understand that the community they live in is blocked off from the rest of the world and how they have their own way of life and rules that the community has to follow. All in all, I would recommend others to read this book, but warn them that at certain parts of the book, it may become boring and seemed to drag on.

Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • A Review of The Giver

    Books

    The Real Truth Behind Hedwig’s Death

  • A Review of The Giver

    Books

    LGBTQ+ Books and TV Shows for Young Adults

  • A Review of The Giver

    Books

    For All Who Are Thirsty

  • A Review of The Giver

    Books

    Finish 2014 With a Good Book

  • A Review of The Giver

    Books

    A Comic of Biblical Proportions

  • A Review of The Giver

    Books

    An Abundance of Katherines

  • A Review of The Giver

    Literature

    Trivial

  • A Review of The Giver

    Features

    Anna Grace Brown: An Oboe Wizard

  • A Review of The Giver

    Editorial/Opinion

    Chasing Mental Health

  • A Review of The Giver

    Editorial/Opinion

    Lady Raider Opinions of Women’s Lacrosse

The student news site of North Forsyth High School
A Review of The Giver